Noodles IV: Rotini and Bleu

Friday, February 22, 2008

Many people think of cost per volume or cost per weight when looking for a good grocery buy. This is easy to figure because this is how many foodstuffs are sold. There are other ways to look at food value, however. Cost per usable weight often comes out differently than the cost of what you buy, for example - about one third of a banana's weight is skin. Considering cost per nutrition leads the shopper to healthier, if more expensive foods like dark coloured greens or whole grain foods rather than their blander, paler counterparts. Convenience is a valid measure of grocery value, though it often comes at a price of flavour and nutrition. Then there is cost per pleasure or cost per flavour. Blue cheese ends up being a great buy on this scale; a small amount packs a great deal of character and flavour.

This is one of those pasta dishes that can be ready in slightly more than the time it takes to boil the noodles. A noodle with high surface area for the sauce to cling to is ideal. I like eating this richly sauced pasta with a pile of steamed vegetables, either greens or squash, that can be cooked over the pasta water. You could also chop some tomatoes to stir in at the end.

Boil 3/4 cup of rotini or other short pasta in salted water. Meanwhile, heat 3 tbs of cream with 1 tbs blue cheese, more or less to taste, in microwave or other container. You can use a pretty strong blue like Gorgonzola or a Danish blue here, or a milder one if desired. Add a pinch of salt to balance cheese if needed. Drain pasta well and stir in sauce til coated. Serves one.

8 comments:

Dennis said...

This sounds like good, simple comfort food for this Ohio winter. I'll experiment with other sharp/pungent cheeses because I rarely buy bleu (but maybe it's time that I do).

Also, I've never commented before and want to say that "serves one" is one thing I love about your blog: Living alone, when I look for ideas I have to scale recipes. Yours usually fit my scale already (not to mention my budget). So, thanks!

Michele said...

I love the deeply personal flavour of your blog - your palate obviously does its own thing and feels no allegiance to any particular cultural norms. I was raised in Hong Kong but now live in NY, and it's nice to see a writer who "gets" an eclectic (erratic?) way of eating.

Deborah said...

Wow! So simple yet so yummy. I've always been an unmovable-fan of Parmesan or Romano, but I like the idea of the creamier cheese with more taste per ounce.

Anonymous said...

Hi all, another use for the sauce - use as a dip for garlic toast.

Dennis, you can definitely use other cheeses. Blue can be an acquired taste but this is a great way to try it, it's not strong at all.

Michele, expat cooking in China is some of the best I've ever had - the best Mexican, the best Italian. And it all has some Chinese characteristics, from the use of local vegetables and flours to being eaten with chopsticks.

-Pepper

Catherine said...

Wonderfully simple and I can almost taste it now....

Anonymous said...

As is, this recipe is right up my alley [if only it weren't for my pesky wheat allergies :( ]

Another great use for this sauce: over a grilled/seared steak (I won't tell your cardiologist, if you don't)

leoparda said...

Hi Pepper, it's Panama Girl from the NY Times Bitten comments :) thanks for the link here!

kazari said...

We made this for lunch last weekend, and my husband ate it before I could take a picture. It was THAT good!